Adam Milstein and Other Israelis Who Have Moved to America

Adam Milstein is a managing partner of Hager Pacific Properties, a highly successful real estate firm in California. He was born in Israel but has lived in Los Angeles since 1981. He is active in a variety of Jewish causes, most notably being a co-founder and the current chairman of the Israel-American Council, which strives to create a community for other Israeli ex-pats.

As highlighted in a May 2018 Newsweek article, Adam Milstein is one of many successful Israelis who have made their home in the United States, and their numbers have been growing in recent years. He notes that the newcomers are different from those of his own generation: while he and his wife, Gila, originally saw their life in America as temporary, most of the newer immigrants come knowing that they will likely stay permanently.

This has caused some concern for the Israeli government. In 2011 it began I-CORE, a bid to lure scholarly émigrés back to the homeland, but it was discontinued within three years. 2013 began “the Israel Brain Gain Program,” a similar initiative aimed at talented people like Adam Milstein, but last year that also ended. It seems as if the problem cannot be solved without addressing the major issues that are driving so many Israeli natives away.

What are these issues? For one, the cost of living in Israel is very high while the average pay (which is $2,765 before taxes) is lower than in other Western countries. Many Israeli-Americans report that they simply could not hope to become successful without moving. Others issues are cultural: observant Jews are becoming a larger demographic (due mostly to high birth rates) and gaining more political clout, while most of the émigrés are young and secular. This also exacerbates economic issues, as many Haredi Jews live off government assistance while considering unpaid religious studies to be their main vocation.

These are all difficult issues to resolve, but if Israel wants to survive it will need to find some way to retain people like Adam Milstein and the hundreds of thousands of others who are leaving the country.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oVUu-IPVgY

Human Rights Advocate Thor Halvorssen Explains His Stance on Socialism

Human Rights Advocate Thor Halvorssen Explains His Stance On Socialism

During a recent interview with Fox News, the respected human rights advocate, Thor Halvorsen was asked about his perspective on the issue of socialism. Before answering the question directly, Halvorssen took a moment to restating the question with his definition of socialism.

He used the examples of how Norway, Denmark and Sweden are ran to explain that separating constitutional rights from government branches and power can be a good thing. Several quickly pointed out that thsee were the same countries mentioned by Bernie Sanders. Ironically, a clip of Bernie Sanders speaking about how America could benefit from socialism reform was played before Halvorssen’s interview.

He also explained that socialism can be done in several different ways. He spoke out that he believed that if put in the wrong hands, such as an authorative government, socialism could hurt human rights.

To make his point, he drew off the example of the country of Venezuela. The country experienced a humanitarian crisis after the country’s price fixing backfired. Halvorssen is very knowledgeable about the crisis, After all, his father was a political prisoner in the troubled country.

Thor Halvorssen has built a reputation as a human rights advocate and has created several non profit organizations to further his mission. One of his organizations, New York’s Human Rights Foundation has helped protect many with its work of bring activists together for common goals.

Halvorssen has also used his stance to create several award winning films focusing on the crisis of child slavery.

His stance on socialism, as expressed during the Fox News interview, shows his understanding of how government affects the rights of individuals and his dedication to fighting for these rights.