Adam Milstein and Other Israelis Who Have Moved to America

Adam Milstein is a managing partner of Hager Pacific Properties, a highly successful real estate firm in California. He was born in Israel but has lived in Los Angeles since 1981. He is active in a variety of Jewish causes, most notably being a co-founder and the current chairman of the Israel-American Council, which strives to create a community for other Israeli ex-pats.

As highlighted in a May 2018 Newsweek article, Adam Milstein is one of many successful Israelis who have made their home in the United States, and their numbers have been growing in recent years. He notes that the newcomers are different from those of his own generation: while he and his wife, Gila, originally saw their life in America as temporary, most of the newer immigrants come knowing that they will likely stay permanently.

This has caused some concern for the Israeli government. In 2011 it began I-CORE, a bid to lure scholarly émigrés back to the homeland, but it was discontinued within three years. 2013 began “the Israel Brain Gain Program,” a similar initiative aimed at talented people like Adam Milstein, but last year that also ended. It seems as if the problem cannot be solved without addressing the major issues that are driving so many Israeli natives away.

What are these issues? For one, the cost of living in Israel is very high while the average pay (which is $2,765 before taxes) is lower than in other Western countries. Many Israeli-Americans report that they simply could not hope to become successful without moving. Others issues are cultural: observant Jews are becoming a larger demographic (due mostly to high birth rates) and gaining more political clout, while most of the émigrés are young and secular. This also exacerbates economic issues, as many Haredi Jews live off government assistance while considering unpaid religious studies to be their main vocation.

These are all difficult issues to resolve, but if Israel wants to survive it will need to find some way to retain people like Adam Milstein and the hundreds of thousands of others who are leaving the country.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oVUu-IPVgY

Yeonmi Park’s Book Details The Hard Road To Freedom

Twenty-two year old North Korean defector Yeonmi Park admits that she isn’t very popular with Kim Jung Un.
During a Women in the World Summit, Park discussed her life after fleeing her home country of North Korea. The human rights activist grew up living under the secretive and brutal dictatorship of Un’s father Kim Jung Il. Freedom is something that the people in North Korea know little about, says Yeonmi.

Her harrowing tale of survival is talked about in her Amazon released book, In Order To Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey To Freedom. Park says she, like most others in country lived under very dire, grim circumstances. Food was scarce and Kim Jung Il ruled with an iron fist. No one would ever raise so much as a whisper against him if they wished to remain alive.

In her book, Park discusses why the family opted to risk death or imprisonment to escape North Korea. After watching a black market copy of Titanic, Park was able to see the true meaning of freedom. It was something she yearned for. Then the unthinkable happened. Her father was jailed on suspicion of smuggling. He was sentenced to a brutal work camp where prisoners died, starved to death or disappeared daily.

Park and her family enlisted the help of human traffickers to help in their escape. According to Park’s statement on Daily Mail, they were no better than Kim Jung Il’s army. Her mother was sexually assaulted during their escape. Sadly, her father died of cancer before he could make it to freedom.

Park says it was with the help of some very good people in China that she and her mother were able to survive. They were finally reunited with her sister who left shortly before their escape.

Park used her experience as a catalyst to helping others in similar situations. She is one of the most popular and sought-after speaker on the human rights front. “It is my obligation to help others because I was helped,” according to Park.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/it-was-a-dark-depressing-moment-north-korean-defector-yeonmi-park-on-freedom/news-story/f2733ecb6b7d1593feec80110863dd93